Necessities + Tips For A 2017 Resume

I’ve been writing resumes since I was 17 looking for my first job my senior year of high school. And the trends for resume building then, are totally different now. But that’s not to say I haven’t evolved as a self proclaimed resume writer. The development of job finders like Careerbuilder, Monster, and LinkedIn have changed the way employers look at candidates. Everything is done with simplicity, style, and professionalism. So today, I’d like to share a few tips and tricks surrounding a 2017 resume and what it should look like. Everything from top to bottom.

“If you can’t stop thinking about it, don’t stop working for it.”

Introduce Yourself

Employers aren’t just looking for someone who can do the job, they’re looking for a real person. Someone with feelings, passion, and drive. Start off your resume with a quick introduction, highlighting who you are and some of your strengths. I’d recommend a professional photo of yourself too. It puts a face to the candidate and could make you seem more personable. Consider this section a “Statement” filled with power verbs. Words like advanced, trained, exceeds, negotiates, and strengthened are perfect starters to include.

Graphs

This is something most may not think about when creating their resume but can act as a lifesaver. We all hate telling employers we are not familiar in a certain category. So, instead of flat out saying yes or no. Try using bar graphs.

Let’s say I’m applying for a web developer position. I’m experienced in many formats but struggle in WordPress a bit. Instead of leaving that off of my resume, I would put it in discretely. I would list my bars accordingly for Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and After Effect. But might list WordPress slightly lower than the others.

It’s not necessarily a bad thing to show your weaknesses to employers. Don’t think of it that way. More than likely, the strength vs weakness question will come up in an interview 9/10 times. You now have something to discuss during that time and can still highlight your other skills. The bar graph acts as an illusion and gives some visuals.

Education

This area can either play a huge or very little role in your resume. If you’re more experienced in real world situations and have held several other jobs pertaining to the one you’re applying for, let that be your main focus. However, if you’re a recent college graduate with very little career experience, let schooling be your reputable back up. Quote letters of recommendations from professors and mentors to help boost your chances. Find the value in yourself and put it on paper.

Professional and Personal

Like I said above, it’s very important to show that you’re human. After all, you’re going to be working with these people. Think of a few words that will show you’re humble but also ready to put in work. Professional ideas could be budget and planning, team leadership, or client support. While personal could include creative spirit, motivated, and fast learner.

“Better is not something you wish, it’s something you become.”

Timelines

This is a modern way to organize your work history. A resume should only be one to two pages long so rally up your three most recent jobs. Each blurb should remind the reader of what your objectives were and day-to-day tasks. Keep this area short and sweet but detailed.

The biggest tip of advice I could give to you all is to just be yourself. As cliche as that sounds, we want to be somewhat transparent when looking for a job. And remember, the career searching process is not just about the employer. Make sure you’re finding what you want and what will benefit you as an individual. It’s your own responsibility to grow into the position you dream of.